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Wagner strikes parked vehicle in log yard

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Sorting
Location: 
Grand Forks, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-12-10
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Wagner operator returned to the scale shack equipment cache in the Wagner to retrieve gear.

After retrieving the gear, the operator proceeded to run the Wagner north and out of the sample yard.

The operator lost track of a parked sand truck and made contact with the left drive tires of the Wagner causing significant damage to the parked vehicle.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • All mobile equipment must slow down, never rush, and wait for assistance if necessary. Meet with operators frequently to discuss rules of the log yard.
  • Log yard unloading cycle times must never take precedence over site safety!
  • In this log yard, parked vehicles or equipment will no longer be stored in close proximity to the Wagner’s normal travel route.
  • Should there be an upset condition, all equipment operators must request a hazard assessment be completed by a Supervisor prior to proceeding.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jake Remo, Sawmill Superintendent, Grand Forks

Jake.Remo@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety Alert-Interfor-Wagner Strikes Parked Vehicle-Grand Forks-Dec 10-2018.pdf

Carbon monoxide leak on camp barge sends worker to hospital

Safety Alert Type: 
Hazardous Materials
Location: 
Coastal BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-30
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

One of Interfor’s leased barges had an exhaust leak in a boiler in the light plant room in the basement.

A worker in the room above suffered from the symptoms of Carbon Monoxide inhalation. The worker was sent to the hospital for oxygen therapy. This was a Lost Time incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Gasoline-powered tools, natural gas heaters, kilns, furnaces and boilers all produce Carbon Monoxide.
  • Daily inspections of engines and fuel fired equipment on barges and in camps are mandatory.
  • Exhaust leaks must be immediately addressed. This may require locking out equipment until repair is complete.
  • Most cookhouse’s have Carbon Monoxide detectors but more must be installed including in common areas.
  • Signs must be posted on barges and in camps where there is a risk to of Carbon Monoxide exposure.
  • Employers must develop and implement an effective exposure control plan which includes training workers and supervisors if there is a risk of Carbon Monoxide exposure.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Gary Bauer, Coastal Woodlands Operations Gary.Bauer@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety Alert-Interfor-Carbon Monoxide in Barge-Coastal Woodlands-Nov 30-2018.pdf

Blasting Close Call: Rock travels 500 metres, penetrates camp cookhouse roof

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
Coastal BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-30
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

An Interfor Coastal Woodland’s road building contractor had a very serious fly rock incident, with a 6-inch rock penetrating through a cookhouse roof.

The cookhouse was occupied at the time and the rock landed within 6 meters of workers. The blue arrow in picture on the left points to hole in roof.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Road crew blasting took place approximately 500 metres of horizontal distance and 400 metres of vertical distance upslope above the cookhouse. Cookhouse workers below were not notified of blast other than via whistles. Helicopter in area did not hear blast notification on radio frequency.

All Blaster’s must know:

  • Blast location on map relative to all workers, structures, boats, aircrafts or other human activity.
  • Where occupied structures are within blasting interphase and must implement a communication plan with the occupants, with direction to clear the structure and move to an established safe zone. Blaster is responsible to ensure blast zone is clear and maintained with guards in place.

Aircraft notification to be improved by broadcasting a 1-minute notification as well as the 5-minute notification on radio frequency. Aircraft are noisy so the radio caller must speak clearly with microphone close to mouth.

No blasting within 1 km of an occupied dwelling. If there is any question as to risk to people, property, aircraft and/or boats, STOP and report to Supervisor.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Gary Bauer, Coastal Woodlands Operations

Gary.Bauer@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety Alert-Interfor-Blasting Close Call-Coastal Woodlands-Nov 30-2018.pdf

Potential undetonated or misfired charge found

Safety Alert Type: 
Road Building/Deactivation
Location: 
Adams Lake Woodlands (Shuswap Region)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-21
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A new road construction contractor was hired to continue with an existing project. While exposing the surface area under the previously blasted material, a potentially misfired or undetonated charge was discovered.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Upon discovering a potentially undetonated or misfired charge, immediately mark the area, and evacuate to a designated ‘safe zone’.
  • Implement effective traffic control on public roads (No Unauthorized Entry sign, barricade road from traffic).
  • Contact WorkSafeBC to report the potential hazard, and discuss required control measures to mitigate public exposure.

Best Practices to Follow:

  • Review blasting records to understand explosive type and hole pattern.
  • Ensure an excavator is on site after blasting, so area can be properly ‘mucked out’ and blaster can assess blasting success on all holes.
  • Educate non-blasting crews on what misfired holes or undetonated explosives look like.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Erik Kok, Operations Superintedent

Erik.Kok@interfor.com

 

File attachments
Safety Alert-Interfor-Undetonated Charge Found-Adams Lake-Nov 21-2018.pdf

Passing industrial vehicles: Be sure it's clear to do so!

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Kootenay Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-07
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A crew truck was struck by a logging truck after attempting to pass on a straight stretch of radio assisted road.

The logging truck driver placed the left turn signal on to turn into a shop yard, and the crew truck driver took this as a sign from the logging truck driver that it was safe to pass.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • On radio assisted roads, do not attempt to pass vehicles or equipment unless confirmed audio communication has been exchanged with all road users in the immediate area.
  • Only pass once the driver has a clear visual assessment for hazards.
  • Always follow at a safe distance & never tailgate – trucks have several blind spots, and may not see you at all times during the passing process.
  • Exercise patience and courtesy towards all other road users.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Kait Baskerville, Kootenay Woodlands Safety & EMS Coordinator

Kait.Baskerville@interfor.com

 

 

File attachments
Safety Alert-Interfor-Passing Industrial Vehicles-Nov 7-2018.pdf

Stud Failure leads to “Wheels Off” Incident

Safety Alert Type: 
Vehicles
Location: 
Hudson Bay, SK
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-12-10
Company Name: 
Weyerhaeuser
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Small cracks were visible on the back face of the outer rim (aluminium) of a heavy commercial vehicle's wheel. Experts indicate that these cracks form between stud holes as a result of wheels being “run loose” at some point. When cracks form from stud hole to outer rim edge, it is the result of contact stress (weights too heavy, hit bad bump etc).

In this incident a single stud had broken approximately 2 months prior to the wheels off incident (due to the cracked rim). Only the damaged stud was replaced and the cracked rims went unnoticed and uncorrected. When the single stud broke, it compromised the remaining studs, that were not replaced. At this point it was only a matter of time before another failure occurred.

Two months later, a catastrophic failure of all 10 studs occurred within 50-100km resulting in a wheels off on a public highway.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When you have problems with wheel end components: a broken stud, a loose nut etc, you must investigate and correct the cause, not just the part that is broken. In this case the cause of the stud failure was the cracked rim. Fixing the broken stud did not - and would not - have prevented this occurrence without also replacing the rim.
  • Manufacturer’s recommendations must always be followed when completing a repair.  Common manufacturers such as Accuride Wheel End Solutions recommend replacing at least one additional stud on each side of a broken one. If two or more break, all must be replaced. From this investigation experts have recommended (due to haul weights) that in the event of even a single stud failure, all should be replaced and all additional wheel end components checked for issues.
  • The location of these cracks would have been extremely difficult to detect unless the wheels were off for maintenance. It is critically important that when wheels are off to change tires or complete other maintenance their components are assessed for damage and replaced if necessary (the age of these cracks was estimated to be at least one year old).
  • Work together with those completing maintenance and repairs, whether they be shops, yourself, or a mechanic you employ. Training and education on how to properly maintain your equipment is paramount and could have prevented this “wheels off” incident. The governing body that inspects the shops which perform this maintenance commercially have followed up and are working with them to ensure that training is provided to their employees.

 

File attachments
Safety_Alert_Cracked_Rims_wheels_off.docx

Log truck compensator failure results in spilled load, smashed pickup truck and injuries

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Akolkolex Forest Service Road (near Revelstoke BC)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-15
Company Name: 
Downie Timber Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Woodlands employee was travelling (to 16km on the Crawford) to visit a timber sale. He was monitoring the radio and communicating his location with logging trucks on the road enroute.

The employee heard a loaded logging truck call their location at 5km and proceeded to clear the road by backing into a wide landing at the bottom of the 4km hill (at 3.5km). His truck was fully clear of the switchback and parked on the other side of the ditch. He watched the loaded truck coming down the hill and the woodlands employee and the driver were chatting as the truck entered the turn of the switchback.

Just as the loaded truck was entering the switch the driver looked in his side mirror and noticed the trailer bunk “locked up” sliding towards the left. The trailer did not slide more than 15-20 metres, neither the woodlands employee or the driver is sure what happened next; the trailer pulled apart and the bundled load was spilled from the rear axle of the truck (still fully contained by wrappers) and struck the woodlands employee’s cleared pick up across the hood and windshield (see photos in attached pdf).

The woodlands employee was shaken up and reported a sore neck (and later - by the time the supervisors arrived on the scene to investigate) a bit of a headache. The employee was taken to hospital and diagnosed with a mild concussion.

The weather at the time of the incident was rainy with temperatures above freezing. Road conditions were muddy and wet with some small icy areas but reported as better than conditions on the previous day.

A truck inspection was completed before the first trip of the day. It was discovered on scene that the trailer pulled apart at the compensator after successfully traveling 3 other switchbacks before this point. The bolt on the compensator was found in the compensator but not in place. A nut was missing from the bunk pin. It is unclear if it was dislodged as a result of the incident or preceding it. Chains next to the compensator (shorter of the 2 sets) were in place. The safety chains normally attached to the reach were not connected to prevent binding on the switch back. The driver indicated the chains normally would be connected before travelling the highway.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Though not a legal requirement on off-highway haul routes, safety chains on the truck trailer could have prevented this incident from occurring. While there is no specific regulation requiring the use of safety chains until traveling on highways, the expectation is that they be put in place as soon as the trucks reach a mainline (ok to leave them off on short block spurs that do not have other traffic). In situations where there is a corner that is too tight, and the chains will bind, the direction is that they must add links to extend the chain and use a bungee cord to hold up the slack.

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
Safety_Alert-Downie_Timber-Log_Truck_Compensator_Failure-Nov_15-2018.pdf

Resource Road Driving: Don't blind the oncoming driver when clearing loaded industrial vehicles

Safety Alert Type: 
Resource Roads
Location: 
REsource roads throughout British Columbia
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-11-09
Company Name: 
INTERFOR
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

As part of the ‘rules of the road’, a loaded industrial vehicle (logging truck, lowbed, etc) always has the right of way.

When clearing vehicles, especially in low light or dark conditions, headlights pointed towards the oncoming vehicle can result in a hazard as it limits the vision for the driver of the oncoming vehicle.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When using a pull out, position your vehicle so that the lights are not in the direction of oncoming traffic.
  • If you choose not to angle your vehicle away from the oncoming traffic, turn off your headlights/light bars and turn on the ‘cargo lamp’ at the back of your vehicle. This ensures that your vehicle still remains visible in the dark while avoiding ‘blinding’ the oncoming driver.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 
File attachments
Safety_Alert-Interfor_ResourceRoadDriving-ClearingLoadedIndustrialVehicles_Nov_9-2018.pdf

Forestry Engineer suffers fractured skull

Safety Alert Type: 
Planning and Engineering
Location: 
West Jordan Main FSR (Shawnigan Lake area)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-10-31
Company Name: 
Iverson Forest Management Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A Forestry Engineer was pulling ribbon on a hillside; the terrain was mostly mossy, open ground, between trees. The Engineer was traversing the hill and took a step downward, causing a dead stick 5mm in diameter to stand straight up, it was below the sight line and easily not seen.

The Engineer followed through with his step and the stick went right up his nose and broke off (see photos in attached pdf).

The stick penetrated through the cribriform plate causing a skull fracture and cerebral spinal fluid to leak out.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always be aware of surroundings, even in easy terrain
  • Do not remove penetrating objects. Leave them in place and seek medical assistance.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Iverson Forest Management (250) 710-1463

File attachments
Hazard_Alert_Iverson_Forest_Mgmt_Inc-Fractured_Skull-Oct_31-2018.pdf

Man-made Hazards

Safety Alert Type: 
Worksites
Location: 
Vancouver Island / Coastal BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2018-09-27
Company Name: 
Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crews completing post-harvest assessments identified “man-made” hazards that had been created in the harvesting phases (see photos in attached pdf).

Crews identified these hazards early, and ensured teams avoided being in the bight. The hazards were also reported to the land owner.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Although these acts may seem to showcase skills in equipment operation, creation of these hazards can be devastating for post-harvest activities including surveying and / or planting.

Created hazards such as these can also be a serious problem months or years down the road, when stumps rot or harvesting occurs in future.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Aaron Frost, OHST, CSO Strategic Natural Resource Consultants Inc.

aaron.frost@snrc.ca

(250) 233-4632

File attachments
Safety_Alert-SNRC-Man_Made_Hazards-Sept_27-2018.pdf
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