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Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Polar mill, at 206 km
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-18
Company Name: 
Stones Bay Holdings
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On January 18, 2007 an off highway load was delivering to the Polar mill. At 206 km he was cleared by an empty truck which had cleared on an outside corner of the road. As the loaded truck rounded the corner the tree length logs on the load swept and made contact with the empty truck. During the investigation 50% of the loads on this road were of the length that you would be at risk clearing at this location. There were no injuries and only minor damage to the empty log truck.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. On hauls involving off highway loads, empty vehicles should not clear on outside corners.
  2. At this particular junction there is a channel change and highway crossing less than ½ km before where the incident occurred. Empties should call empty to determine if there are loads close prior to crossing the highway.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

108 Douglas Avenue, Box 1599 Fort St. James, BC V0J 1P0

Phone [250]996-8912

File attachments
2008-01-18 Side-Swiped Loaded Logging Truck.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
DOC 097 (19.5 on the 300 Road) to Canfor’s PG Sawmill
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-30
Company Name: 
LTN Contracting Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On January 30, 2008 at approximately 7:00 AM a contract log hauler (Burke Purdon Enterprises Ltd.) was transporting a load of logs from DOC 097 (19.5 on the 300 Road) to Canfor’s PG Sawmill.

Approximately 10 KM after leaving the loader, the driver noticed six logs hanging outside the pup trailer bunks on the passenger side. The driver put an extra wrapper over the logs, placed flags on the outlying logs and proceeded to haul the load to PG Sawmill. The driver did not notify either of LTN’s on-site supervisors.

Upon arriving at the mill, the scaler notified the Log Yard Manager. The truck was parked immediately and Canfor notified LTN of the truck being parked.

LTN’s Operations Manager was contacted and traveled over to the mill to examine the load with Canfor’s woodlands safety officer. Upon inspection and review with the driver, it was determined that the load had shifted forward approximately 6 to 8 inches, from bottom to top.
While examining the load, it was noted that the logs that fell out of the bank bunk had shifted forward, but that the front end of some of the logs were hanging over the front bunk by at least 18 to 20 inches. Bunk spread was 12.5 to 13 foot and the un-bunked logs appeared to be 16 and 20 foot long. Measurement of log length was not completed due to danger of logs falling. It appears that if these logs had been centered on the bunks they would have shifted, but may not have fallen out of the rear bunk.

There were no injuries and no damage from the incident.

The BPEL driver had been audited by LTN on January 29, 2008 and was found to be a competent worker and knowledgeable of the licensee and company rules and guidelines.
Contributing factors include:

  • The shifting of the load due to a build up of snow and ice on the bunks, combined with cold conditions and snow covered logs;
  • Loading logs too close to the bunks when not forced to do so; and,
  • The lack of preparation / situational awareness following the logs coming out of the bunk.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. The drivers are professional and should be aware of unfavorable conditions and react to these conditions accordingly. Remind log haul drivers that snow covered logs are prone to shifting when placed on snow and ice covered bunks. Drivers, when noting the snow and ice build up on the bunks, should use their axe or shovel to clear the snow and ice off the bunks. This will allow firm contact between the logs and the bunks and minimize the potential for log shifting.
  2. Loader operators are to square the loads on the bunks and center the logs as best they can. If centered, the logs can shift forwards or backwards with minimized risk of falling out of the bunks.
  3. Remind all workers (including logging crew, log truck drivers and other road users) that dangerous conditions can come to exist at any time of the work day. When coming across a previously identified hazard, the Worker should control the hazard or access to the hazard as best possible and contact their supervisor. Work should cease immediately. Work should not continue until the hazard is removed or controlled and the Supervisor has given the Worker notification that it is safe to continue work.

 

File attachments
2008-01-30 Shifting Loads.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
2025.5km near Farwell Canyon
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-17
Company Name: 
Westline Harvesting
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On January 17, 2008 one of our empty logging trucks was involved in a collision with a loaded tridem hayrack logging truck at 2025.5km near Farwell Canyon. Our empty truck saw the loaded truck coming to the corner and pulled over to his side of the road and brought his truck to a complete stop. The loaded truck failed to remain on its own side of the road as it rounded the corner, and its trailer contacted our empty truck causing extensive damage to the driver’s side (bumper, fender, cab and lead bunk) of the empty truck. The loaded truck sustained no noticeable damage. There were no injuries in this incident. However, the incident had the potential to cause a serious injury and/or a fatality.

ROOT CAUSES:

  • Loaded truck did not remain on own side of road.
  • Driver of loaded truck failed to monitor and compensate for the off-tracking of the tridem hayrack trailer.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always ensure that you remain on your own side of road.
  • Drivers must monitor trailer off-tracking (especially tridem hayracks), and keep them on own side of road.
  • Suggestion was made to implement “Mandatory Call Points” at critical locations such as this corner.
  • Report all incidents and close calls to your supervisor.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

David Whitwell at 250-392-4822

File attachments
2008-01-17 Loaded Truck Collides With Empty Tuck.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Prince George Woodlands
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-31
Company Name: 
Canfor
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

On Janaury 30, 2008 a log truck driver was transporting a load of logs north of Prince George. Approximately 10 km after leaving the loader, the log truck driver noticed six logs hanging on the outside of the pup trailer bunks on the passenger side of load (see pictures below). Driver indicated during interview that he first tried to pull the logs off the load by hand in order to make the load safe. Driver said that he wasn’t able to pull the logs off load, so he decided to put on an extra wrapper over the logs and placed flags on the outlying logs. Driver indicated he felt it was safe to continue to haul the logs into PGSAW mill because he had put on the extra wrapper and due to the fact logs were on the passenger side of truck rather than drivers side of truck. The load was hauled in this unsafe condition for approximately 60 km (25 km on logging roads and 35 km on a paved public highway).

The load was clearly in an unsafe condition when examined at PGSAW. Luckily this load was hauled into the mill with no incident or injuries. This load could easily have caused a very serious accident on either the logging road or the highway if the logs had dislodged from the load.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Prince George Woodlands Safety Committee would like to share some key learnings/messages from this very serious unsafe hauling incident.

1. All drivers must immediately STOP hauling if a load becomes unsafe during transit. Load must be fixed prior to the continuation of hauling.

2. Never attempt to pull an unsafe log off a load. Serious injury could result by completing this unsafe act.

Reminder: No load of logs is so important that we must endanger the lives of the public or fellow road users to get it delivered.

Please park your truck immediately and get the load corrected before continuing.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Neil Spendiff – Woodlands safety Coordinator

File attachments
2008-01-31 Unsafe Hauling of Logs.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Km 634 on 600 Merton Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-09
Company Name: 
Lo-Bar Log Transport
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At 1:15 pm on January 9/08, Lo-Bars’ truck #324 was traveling loaded on the Merton 600 Rd. A log truck hauling pulp short logs entered the 600 Rd. at 650.5 km, about 3 km behind truck #324. At this point, the drivers of the 2 loaded trucks entered into a verbal agreement that the 2nd log truck would remain silent and rely on the lead truck to let him know if he met any empty traffic.

At km 634, truck#324 met Lo-Bars’ truck #321, who had pulled out to clear #324. Truck #324s’ driver called “634 – both ways”. Truck #321 pulled back on the road & traveled to 635.5, where he met the silent loaded log truck. Truck #321 was forced into the ditch to avoid an accident, and the silent log truck carried on by, not calling or stopping to see if the empty truck & driver were OK.

It appears the silent log truck driver missed the “634-both ways” call, which would have been his only opportunity to learn of oncoming traffic.

This incident clearly illustrates why all loaded trucks must call for themselves, if not in a convoy of less than 1 km spacing.

This was discussed at a Driver Safety Meeting at Lo-Bar on Saturday, January 12/08 to reaffirm to our drivers the necessity of consistently following the radio calling procedures and encouraging other road users to do so.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

All road users must call for themselves if not in a convoy of less than 1 km spacing. Follow radio call procedures at all times.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lo-Bar Log Transport Ltd.

(250) 563-8640

File attachments
2008-01-09 Close Call Bewteen Empty and Loaded Logging Trucks.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
20.5 km on Salmon FSR
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-04
Company Name: 
Lo-Bar Log Transport
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

At 11:45 am on January 4/08, a Lo-Bar truck was traveling loaded on the Salmon FSR. The log truck came down the hill at 21 km and then proceeded around a corner at the bottom of the hill. When the driver came around the corner there was an oil bucket on the road. The log truck driver thought the oil bucket was a log; so he touched his brakes in order to slow down to avoid the object. The trailer pup ended up kicking out and caught some snow on the shoulder of the road. This sucked the trailer into the ditch and flipped the unit on its side. Road conditions were slippery at the time of incident.

The log truck driver had his seat belt on and ended up with a strained shoulder muscle when he released himself. The incident could have been much more serious had driver not been wearing his seatbelt.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

• Driver was traveling faster than corner could handle especially due to slippery roads conditions. All road users need watch their speed and drive to the road conditions.
• Reminder to all road users to ensure that items are secured in your vehicles so that they don't blow out onto the logging roads and create hazards for others.
• Reminder to all road users to take the extra time to stop and pick up any debris on logging roads that may create a hazard to others traveling on the road. Someone picking up the oil pail on the road may have prevented this incident from occurring.
• Expect the unexpected at all times.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lo-Bar Log Transport Ltd.

(250) 563-8640

File attachments
2008-01-04 Loaded Logging Truck Hits Ditch And Rolls.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
500 Road-east of Quesnel
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-27
Company Name: 
Inwood Trucking
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded tridem long log truck was loaded on the 500 Road. The road was in winter condition-frozen and icy. While coming around a corner on a 10-12% downhill slope, the logging truck met a pick up (empty direction) towing a trailer with 2 snowmobiles on it. The pick up did not have a radio. The log truck tried to slow and allow the pick up to pass, however, the pick up driver panicked and began to back up. The trailer behind the pick up jackknifed in front of the logging truck, blocking the road. At this point, the log truck driver applied his brakes, causing his trailer to jackknife as well. The right front corner of the loaded logging truck bumped the snowmobile trailer, pushing the pick up around. At this point the loaded truck came to a stop.

During the investigation, it became known that the pick up was on the wrong road. The young driver had become lost while looking for a popular snowmobile area and turned onto an active logging road. He ignored the signs warning of radio use and industrial traffic. There was minimal damage to both vehicles and no injuries. However, the potential for serious injury was enormous. Only the defensive driving of the log truck driver prevented a more serious outcome.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Public should be more aware of industrial traffic and radio control on multi user roads.
2. Pick ups should be radio equipped, keep to their own side of the road and use pullouts to clear industrial traffic.
3. All log truck drivers should drive defensively and be aware of non industrial, recreational traffic at all times.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Lloyd Inwood

(250) 992-6097

File attachments
2007-12-27 jacknifed trailer close call.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
1320.5 km-east of Quesnel
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-23
Company Name: 
Inwood Trucking
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A short log truck was returning to the bush on the 1300 Road. Winter road conditions were present. After calling “1318 empty” the driver cleared a loaded truck and started to the bush again. After calling “1320 empty” the driver was proceeding around a right hand corner at 1320.5 when he met a loaded truck. The driver of the empty truck swerved to the right in an attempt to allow the load to pass. However, he could not completely leave the road due to the heavy snow bank. The driver of the loaded truck also swerved to try and clear the empty truck, hitting the ditch in the process.

Despite the road being wide enough, the trucks could not clear each other and the driver’s sides of the trucks hit. The empty truck sustained damage to the driver’s side cab and the trailer. The loaded truck sustained severe damage from the impact and from hitting the ditch in an effort to avoid the crash. Fortunately, there were no injuries as a result of the incident.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. Warn all drivers to use radios and clear loaded traffic.
2. Keep to proper side of road
3. Keep speed down during periods of winter road conditions.
4. Drive defensively and expect the unexpected.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

(250) 992-6097

File attachments
2007-12-23 Near Miss Head-On Collision.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
Creston
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-17
Company Name: 
J.H. Huscroft Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

A loaded log truck had stopped at the 0 km board of a Forest Service Road to remove chains, inspect truck, and tighten up. Snow, mud, bark, and other debris was falling off the load. In the process of removing the chains and tightening up the wrappers debris fell into the driver’s eye. The driver scratched his eye and required medical attention subsequently missing the following next of work.

Truck driver’s should be encouraged to wear safety glasses while outside of the cab inspecting the load or while working underneath the truck, particularly on windy days or during other adverse weather conditions. Any injuries to the eye need to be treated seriously and eye protection should be worn whenever there is risk of flying/falling debris striking your face.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

922 32nd Avenue S. R.R.#1
Creston, B.C. V0B 1G1
Phone: (250) 428-7106 Fax: (250) 428-2366

File attachments
2008-01-17 Debris In Eye Requires First Aid.pdf

Log Hauling

Safety Alert Type: 
Log Hauling
Location: 
BC Southern Interior
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-01
Company Name: 
H.A. Friedenberger Contracting Ltd
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

As his logging truck was being loaded, a contract logging truck operator stood on the end of a log, positioning himself in front of the truck on the driver’s side. The log he was standing on ran the full length of the truck and trailer, and the log was lying on the ground on the offside of the logging truck (loader was loading from the other side of the truck). The logging truck was facing downhill at an angle of approximately 12% as it was being loaded.

The company safety coordinator noticed the situation and intervened by motioning to the truck driver - directing the driver to walk to a safe place down the road and speak with the coordinator. The safety coordinator and the truck driver discussed the situation, and following the discussion the driver repositioned himself to a safe place while his truck was being loaded.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

1. The safety coordinator Informed the logging truck operator that if a log being loaded went over the bunks on the off-side and fell onto the ground on the offside, the log would strike the log that the driver was standing on, and the driver would likely be launched into the air with the potential of sustaining injuries.

Logging truck operators must not position themselves in a hazardous area while their truck is being loaded

2. The coordinator also informed the truck driver that the driver was in the line of fire if a log slipped through the loader grapple (no ice nubs were welded on the grapple) because the angle of the grapple was proportionate to the road slope (12% downslope and difficult for loaderman to compensate for the 12% slope).

Again, logging truck operators must not position themselves in a hazardous area while their truck is being loaded. Also, whenever possible, logging trucks should be loaded on flat ground (not possible in this case due to road side decking, and road grade was at least 10% for a long distance in both directions).

File attachments
2008-01-01 Close Call Due to Position.pdf
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