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Manual harvesting/bucking

Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-27
Company Name: 
Long Shot Holdings Ltd.
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Due to road builders falling the right of way into the standing timber, an entangled mess of trees was left standing at the north end of the block. A faller was sent in to clear out the mess. The faller attempted to straighten the mess and in doing so a tree slid down another; which had been left fallen down through the standing timber. This caused the ground that the faller was working around to become unstable.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

A loader could not knock the trees down because of the steepness of the right of way. It was decided to drag the trees over with the lines of the grapple yarder. It was noted that this was a high hazard incident and the outcome could have been worse than it was. All employees were reminded that everyone has the right to refuse unsafe work.

INVESTIGATION: It was shown that the road builders had fallen the right of way trees into the standing timber. This made it hard for a loader to knock them down as the slope was to steep on the right of way. The faller attempted to fall the trees and after the way the first tree came down the faller refused to attempt the others. The faller did the right thing.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Laura Olynyk

Long Shot Holdings

File attachments
2007-12-27 Faller close call.pdf

Manual harvesting/bucking

Location: 
Clearwater
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-14
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Hand faller fell small Pine tree which landed on some debris on ground kicking up small piece of slash that came back and hit him in the knee causing a loud snapping noise. He had previously bucked some slash in the path of the tree prior to falling it. The faller continued to work as no pain was experienced but began to notice incomplete functioning of his knee. He still finished his day (he only had a few trees left) then went to hospital. Doctor diagnosed him with a 3rd degree tear of NCL tendon on his right knee. He will be off work or on light duty for approximately 6 weeks.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Review with hand fallers the concept of taking a few steps further away from falling trees when working in areas of heavy slash loading. Also to continue and possibly enhance practice of bucking slash in path of falling trees even though in this case the chunk which hit him may have already been bucked.

File attachments
2007-12-14 Faller Tears NCL Tendon.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Km 22.5 Eakin Creek FSR (coming from Highway 24) Little Fort, BC
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-06-13
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

The following incident occurred on a tree-planting project. The description is based on the interviews with all five occupants of the vehicle, conducted on June 13, 2008 between 2:20 pm and 6:30 pm.

On the morning of June 13 there were five people traveling to work in a 2008 Dodge, 1-ton crew cab with a tree canopy. The crew boss was driving. All 5 occupants of the vehicle were wearing their seatbelts. The truck box and tree canopy contained only a few partial boxes of trees (approximately 300 total), fire equipment (2 packs, 3 shovels, 2 Pulaski, a spill kit, planter’s bags and personal gear.

The crew had been travelling on the same route to access their planting blocks for the previous 3 days. The truck left the pavement and turned down Eakin Creek FSR in two-wheel drive. The driver called “Down Eakin at 24 km” and then proceeded down Eakin. It was raining considerably at the time (high setting on windshield wipers). Occupants report that the vehicle was travelling between 30 and 50 km/hr and there was normal everyday conversation while listening to satellite radio. As the crew cab approached the first bend in the road the truck slid out and the driver felt a loss of control of the vehicle as it slid to the right side of the road. The driver reports that he began tapping the brakes to try to regain control and then feeling the truck continuing to slide toward the ditch. The truck nearly came to a stop and then rolled over an embankment (approximately 3-4 metres) towards Eakin Creek, landing upside down. The air bags were not employed. All occupants were able to unbuckle their seatbelts and exit the vehicle safely. The driver checked the vehicle for possible fuel leaks and found none. The workers were found by a passing road crew and transported to a nearby fishing resort. From there, the driver called the owner of the company, via satellite phone to report the incident at approximately 8:00 am.

No serious injuries were sustained and all 5 workers returned to work the following day.

Statement of Causes:

  • The road is narrow on this bend with no ditch and a narrow shoulder that drops off towards the creek. In order to anticipate oncoming traffic the tendency is to stay slightly wide to the right. The road has a slight lean towards the creek at this point (to the right).
  • Due to the rain, the non-compacted edge of the road was more slippery than usual.
  • A swab substance test was conducted with the driver. The results were negative.
  • Driver and crew ruled out fatigue as a factor.
  • Based on interviews there were no distractions to the driver at the time.
  • Interviews with the vehicle occupants state that the vehicle was travelling at a safe speed prior to the incident (50km/hr maximum). The driver is in his second season as management on the project and has up-to-date driver training and familiarity with the roads in the area. A review of written Mid-Season Planter Reviews shows positive feedback on the driver’s safe driving habits.

Root Cause:

  • Slippery conditions / Upset or changed conditions
  • Not using 4-wheel drive as a preventative tool.
  • One can always drive slower when conditions change.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 

The Company held a Safety Meeting, with the camp involved on Saturday, June 14th at 7:00 am. The following topics were discussed with the camp:

  • “Seat belts minimized the injuries to the workers and possibly saved their lives.”
  • A reminder to remain diligent about seat belt use in all company vehicles at all times.
  • “Safe Start” review (Mental safety tool to check your state of mind while at work)
  • R.A.D.A.R. review (Mental safety tool to recognize and adapt safely to changing conditions)
  • All company drivers reminded to adjust speed according to conditions—I.E. rain, wet roads.
  • All company drivers reminded to use 4-wheel drive when experiencing wet road conditions
  • Safety Alert was sent to all Company Management and Safety Officers and to The BC Forest Safety Council.

 

File attachments
2008-06-13 truck slids off road.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Mackenzie, BC, 31.8 km on Finlay Forest Service Road (FSR)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-10-20
Company Name: 
Associated Engineering
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

After completing a close proximity bridge inspection 187 kilometres out on the Finlay FSR, the employee was returning to Mackenzie for the evening. As the worker approached the bridge crossing, Tsedaka Creek at 32 km the driver side front tire blew. The driver tried to retain control of the vehicle however, due to the blown tire and the curve in the road, the vehicle collided with the guardrail, and the passenger side of the vehicle jumped the rail.

Once on the guardrail, the vehicle slid the entire length of the bridge and came to a stop at the concrete barrier on the opposite side of the bridge.

The driver did not sustain any injuries, and the vehicle had an estimated damage of $2,000.
Root Causes:

  • Improper tires for the work required, stock all-season tires.
  • Poor visibility, the incident occurred at 8:00 pm (dark).
  • Deteriorating road conditions, the temperature was 0° Celsius.
  • Extended work day.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • When using rental vehicles inspect tires to ensure they are in good condition, and suitable for performing the work required.
  • Drive to the road conditions (limited visibility and traction).
  • Be aware that working extended hours may result in slower reaction times. Take rest breaks when driving for/or working extended hours.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Sandra Nielsen: 604-293-1411

File attachments
2007-10-20 Truck Jumps Gaurdrail After Tire Blows.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
4900 Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-02-21
Company Name: 
Westroad Resource Consultants
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Crew in pickup was driving empty on the 500/4900 road system. The crew changed to the appropriate road channel once on the 4900 road and began calling kilometers. They called at 4938, 4940, 4942, 4944, 4946. The crew did not hear any other traffic calling so they did not call at 4948. While driving over a hill at approximately 4948.25km, the crew met a loaded logging truck traveling in the middle of the road. The loaded truck had to swerve back into his lane and the crew just managed to drive by the truck in their lane and avoid a collision.

Fortunately, when the loaded truck had to swerved abruptly, his load stayed on. Both vehicles continued in the direction they were headed.

The crew then called the truck on the radio and asked him if he could hear their
radio. He said that this was the first time he had heard anybody on the radio.

The crew tested their truck radio back at the office at the end of the day and it was
working fine on send and receive.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. Always drive forestry roads with the assumption that somebody may be coming at you in the other direction at any given time.
  2. Always call road kilometers, even if you don’t hear other traffic on the road.
  3. Inform the client of the close call and suggest that they remind all drivers (pickups and logging trucks) on forestry roads to always call kilometers and conduct radio checks to ensure that radios are working properly.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Jim Kurta
Westroad Resource Consultants Ltd.
Quesnel, B.C.
250-992-2987

File attachments
2008-02-21 Near Collision with Loaded Logging Truck.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Port McNeill Forest Operation
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-03-14
Company Name: 
Western Forest Products
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Pickup 3065 was heading up Branch W 173 in 2nd gear, traveling at approx. 20 km/h, to check on the Cat Operator.

A trainee Cat Operator was driving pickup 3835 down the hill in 3rd gear, traveling at approx. 50-60kmh, to get the grader to assist the Cat Operator with snow removal.

The 3065 was rounding an uphill left hand curve in the road (10% grade) when unexpectedly the 3835, which was carrying a full tidy tank of diesel, appeared rounding the same corner from the opposite direction.

Both drivers, who were wearing seatbelts, braked hard. Due to the short time frame/distance between the two vehicles, the 3065 was able to stop, but was not able to get completely in the clear before the 3835 collided into the front end.

There were no injuries.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  1. Drivers must always drive to the road conditions.
  2. Drivers must expect the unexpected.
  3. Although driving by the radio is not advocated, it is an effective tool that should be used to communicate, especially in upset conditions.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Vince Devlin 250-956-5318 or vdevlin@westernforest.com

File attachments
2008-03-14 Front-End Collision.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Coquihalla Phase III
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-15
Company Name: 
Upper Nicola Natural Resources
Details of Incident / Close Call: 
  • Shovels & hand tools were strapped to the roof rack of the silviculture crew suburban.
  • The rubber cord/s broke and the hand tools were blown into the middle of the two north bound lanes,
  • When trying to retrieve the equipment passing cars hit the hand tools and sent them flying through the air nearly hitting the silviculture crew members and other motorists.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Always check your vehicle prior to each trip.
  • When carrying gear/load ensure it is safely secured.
  • In this case a fixed dry box will be fitted to the roof rack to enclose all
  • tools/gear.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Shawn Nicolas (250) 350-3342

File attachments
2008-01-15 Broken Strap Causes Flying Tools.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
17 km Bear Main/Merritt TSA
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2008-01-24
Company Name: 
Upper Nicola Natural Resources
Details of Incident / Close Call: 
  • Log truck/silviculture crew suburban narrowly missed contact due to missed radio calls when approaching a frequency switch board.
  • Silviculture crew suburban took the ditch as the best option.
  • No injuries and no damage.
  • The next log truck lost time as it pulled the suburban from the ditch.

 

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Ensure all crew members are aware of the radio calling procedures and use
  • the radio clearly and consistently,
  • Continue to call kms (loaded/empty) as per the road protocol and in advance
  • of any switch boards,
  • Pay attention to the radio, do not scan channels and only use one radio,
  • Do not switch channels prior to a switch board,
  • Announce your presence at the switch board and ask if anyone is close.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Shawn Nicolas (250) 350-3342

File attachments
2008-01-24 Close Call Due To Radio Callings.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Campbell River, B.C., Private Logging Road
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-04-13
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

Worker was alone in a pick up, driving to work at 8:00 a.m. There was a trace of snow in the rain. Worker attempted to negotiate a corner on the gravel road but the truck continued to travel straight and left the road, rolling over several times, stopping approximately 60m. down a steep embankment. The worker was wearing his seatbelt. The worker suffered shoulder injuries,cut to his head and bruised legs. He was able to use his radio to contact help.

Learnings and Suggestions: 
  • Slow down.
  • Pay attention and drive to road conditions.
  • Continue to reinforce the use of seatbelts.
  • Annually review drivers abstracts.
  • Revise call-in procedure to be initiated when an employee leaves his marshalling point, rather than when they arrive at the job site. Had the employee not been able to use his radio there could have been a time lag between assistance being rendered.

 

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Neil McIver 250-287-2220

File attachments
2007-04-13 truck leaves road and rolls over.pdf

Crew Transport

Location: 
Squamish, B.C., Stawamus Forest Service Road (FSR)
Date of Incident / Close Call: 
2007-12-13
Company Name: 
Infinity-Pacific Stewardship Group
Details of Incident / Close Call: 

4 employees were proceeding at the speed limit along the Stawamus FSR. The road was snow covered at the time of the incident with fresh snow falling. 2 employees were in a company vehicle while the other 2 workers were ahead in a private vehicle. There was radio contact between the trucks and a distance of ~200 meters separated the vehicles. The company vehicle was negotiating a steep section of the FSR when the truck began to slide backwards. The employee had no choice but to maneuver the truck into the ditch. At this point it was decided that chains should be applied to the tires to improve traction in the snowy conditions. The private vehicle returned to the scene and helped the other workers get the vehicle out of the ditch. Even after the chains were applied the company vehicle continued to slide on the road, and it was decided that the FSR was unfit for travel and access to the work area could not be attained safely.

Learnings and Suggestions: 

Following this incident it was decided that it would be prudent to upgrade to new winter tires to increase the available traction of the truck. It was also decided that extra shovels and other winter safety equipment should be added to the existing inventories in the truck.

A winter driving Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) was developed and distributed to employees to ensure that they were aware of how to negotiate winter driving conditions. It was also stressed to employees that they should check the road and weather conditions before heading out so they are aware of the conditions they might encounter throughout the work day. Lastly it was reiterated that if there was any concern about the safety of the road for travel the employee(s) should not feel obligated to negotiate the road.

For more information on this submitted alert: 

Chris Gruenwald: 604-460-1390 ext.231

File attachments
2007-12-13 Winter Conditions Result in Crash.pdf
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