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Falling Supervisor Workload Analysis and Survey

Falling Supervisor Survey

During the Falling Supervisor Workload Analysis conducted in 2010, a recommendation to conduct a Falling Supervisor survey was made. Thank you to the 102 falling supervisors that participated. We will be using the results to improve faller safety in our programs and training. Click here to view the Full Version or Abbreviated Version.

Condolences to the community of Burns Lake

The BC Forest Safety Council would like to offer its sincere condolences to those affected by the recent tragedy in Burns Lake at the Babine Forest Products Mill. Those who have been lost or injured, their families, and the workers of Babine Forest Products will experience the aftermath of this disaster for some time to come.

Working Safely in Avalanche Country Workshop

This session covers what to look out for when working in avalanche terrain, what equipment you need and tips for staying safe in the woods during winter.

The workshop is being presented by Carole Savage, a Registered Professional Forester and an Active Member of the Canadian Avalanche Association. Carole is experienced in both forestry operations/avalanche control and delivers the snowmobile backcountry avalanche workshops training for the Canadian Avalanche Association. WorkSafe BC will also be on hand to answer your questions about changes in the avalanche regulation (4.1.1 – Snow Avalanche Assessments).

This workshop is suitable for field workers, safety coordinators, company owners, equipment operators and anyone who may be working in avalanche exposure areas.

WorkSafeBC approves 2011 amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation Effective Feb 1, 2012

At its October 2011 meeting, WorkSafeBC’s Board of Directors approved amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. These amendments will become effective on February 1, 2012. Click on the link below to view a summary of the approved changes.

Driving Change - Article Published in Silviculture Magazine Fall 2011 Issue

Article by Steven Mueller published in the Fall 2011 issue of Silivculture Magazine, www.silviculturemagazine.com

You don’t need a safety consultant to tell you that the greatest risk to silviculture workers is driving. Any tree planter can tell you that. Heading out to camp, riding to work in the crummy, backing up to the reefer, or running to town for supplies; most incidents causing significant loss will likely happen on (or off) the road. Granted, silviculture workers are more likely to suffer injuries due to repetitive stress, or slips, trips and falls. However, the big ticket items - serious injury, fatality, major vehicle damages and costly production loss - are usually due to vehicle incidents.

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SAFER

Improving transportation safety in forest operations

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